Of the dams that still stand in Glastonbury, few have been built with the same craftsmanship and beauty as Smut Pond. Renovated in the 1970’s, the 15-foot high dam features a curved top with a remarkable arch sluiceway.

Depending on the time of year, water flows over the top, creating a picturesque waterfall. On the northern side, the arched sluicegate remains fully-functional. It empties into a little pool area, where some of it flows into the still-intact sluiceway. Sticks and other garbage have blocked up the flow of water, but the retaining walls are still visible, and can be followed all the way back to where it reconnects with Roaring Brook.

The sluiceway forms a small island, where some of the foundation of the mill still remains along with scrap metal scattered on the ground. There’s also some foundations and wells that can still be seen from the surround buildings.

The Hartford Courant details the history of the site well. The site was first occupied by a forge, which gives the area the name since the constant burning covered the entire area in black soot. Roaring Brook was dammed at this point as early as the 1700’s. The location changed hands around 1850 by the Hartford Manufacturing Company – the same company that owned the mill in Cotton Hollow.

Under the new ownership, two new mills were built and operated through the 19th century. Eventually, the JT Slocumb Company – who ran the Hopewell Mill upstream – gave the property to the town, who still owns it today.

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